Cheap Men’s Detroit Lions Calvin Johnson Nike Gray Gridiron Gray Limited Jersey

Calvin Johnson jersey cheap for sale

On Sunday, Pittsburgh Steelers tight end Jesse James had a controversial touchdown catch overturned. He caught the ball, turned to lunge for the goal line, and made it across. The ball hit the ground, though, and moved as he reached out. That small movement was enough to have it ruled incomplete, even though he’d plucked it out of the air and then only lost it because he was trying to score.

It was similar to Detroit Lions wideout Calvin Johnson’s apparent touchdown catch in 2010, against the Chicago Bears. Johnson leapt up to make the grab with just seconds remaining, caught the ball, landed, turned, fell so that his knee hit, and then reached out with the ball to brace himself on the ground. When he did so, the ball popped out. Johnson didn’t even try to grab it as the announcers went crazy; everyone watching that play thought it was a game-winning touchdown.

Then the refs blew the whistle, reviewed it, and said it didn’t count because he hadn’t controlled the ball all the way through the ground.

After watching James suffer the same fate, former Indianapolis Colts coach and Super Bowl champion Tony Dungy didn’t hold back.

“In trying to make the catch-no catch rule black and white for the officials after Calvin Johnson’s play in 2010 the NFL has made a mistake,” Dungy wrote. “Balls that EVERYONE thinks are catches are actually incomplete.”

For what it’s worth, the NFL appears to be enforcing the rule properly. Dungy’s argument is just that the rule is wrong. Anyone who sees those plays thinks they’re obviously catches for touchdowns. The rule defines them as heartbreaking incomplete passes. He thinks they should revise the rule, especially since games are literally being decided based on these replay overturns.

cheap kids nfl jerseys

Nick Saban, Gus Malzahn and the rest of the millionaire coaches club must pay plenty of attention to recruiting right now, but it’s not all focused on high school prospects.

There’s also the notion of current players deciding whether to jump early to the NFL.

The top candidate, of course, is Auburn running back Kerryon Johnson.

Auburn’s workhorse back emerged as a Heisman Trophy candidate, despite missing two early games with hamstring injury, and ran for 1,320 yards and 17 touchdowns. He averaged an SEC-best 120 yards rushing per game, but is now battling rib and shoulder injuries sustained in the Iron Bowl.
wholesale jerseys china us
Johnson’s decision on whether to stay in college or head early to the NFL has major implications for Auburn’s football program. Running back Kamryn Pettway, who missed all of 2017 with an injury, seems destined to turn pro.

So, if Johnson and Pettway head to the NFL, would that decimate Auburn’s running game? Would the Tigers be required to turn to true freshman Asa Martin? Should Malzahn lobby Johnson to stay for another college season or head to the NFL, knowing the short shelf life for NFL running backs?

As practices began this week for Alabama and Auburn and both teams preparing for bowl games on Jan. 1, the questions surrounding Johnson and other standout underclassmen will intensify.

Underclassmen have until Jan. 15 to file declaration papers with the league, so players have less than a month to make a final decision.

Mitchell and Ness Raiders Bo Jackson #34 Stitched White NFL Jersey

wholesale jersey shirts

Bo Jackson, one of the most talented athletes to ever walk the earth and one of the most fun players to watch in two different sports, says the only reason he played football was a general ignorance of what it does to people.

Speaking to USA Today as he prepares to accept an award from a baseball scouts association, Jackson said the information about brain injuries in football has progressed to the point where it would have turned him off to the sport.

“If I knew back then what I know now,” Jackson tells USA TODAY Sports, “I would have never played football. Never. I wish I had known about all of those head injuries, but no one knew that. And the people that did know that, they wouldn’t tell anybody.

“The game has gotten so violent, so rough. We’re so much more educated on this CTE stuff, there’s no way I would ever allow my kids to play football today.

“Even though I love the sport, I’d smack them in the mouth if they said they wanted to play football.

“I’d tell them, ‘Play baseball, basketball, soccer, golf, just anything but football.’”

To be clear, Jackson is only talking about head trauma here. A hip injury forced him out of the NFL and shortened his MLB lifespan, but he says he “wouldn’t change a thing” about his career, and has no regrets.

But Jackson joins a growing number of former NFL players who say the increased knowledge of football’s correlation to lasting, traumatic brain injury and degeneration would have colored their own decisions to play. It’s obviously easier for them to say that when it’s a pure hypothetical, but it’d be naive to think there aren’t young athletes making the same calculations in the head right now.

The argument you’ll see around—mostly in the ESPN.com comments, actually—goes something like These players knew what they were getting into. Everyone always knew smashing your head is bad for your brain. But that’s simply not true. This wasn’t something anyone talked about until the last decade or so. Discussion of brain trauma and CTE and concussion science is everywhere now, but the only mainstream acknowledgment of concussions there ever used to be was an announcer saying of a player, “he got his bell rung,” or some such. The NFL produced compilations videos of its hardest hits. ESPN’s “Jacked Up” segment, a snuff reel in retrospect, only stopped airing in 2008. The media certainly wasn’t writing about long-term effects of concussions, especially in the pre-internet era, and there was nowhere for players to learn about the potential life-ruining or life-shortening consequences of their profession.

Not unless they decided to read the odd article in scientific journals, which I don’t think they were. There was actually a dearth of research about head injuries in football specifically, because punch-drunkenness was seen mostly as a boxing problem. After all, football players wore helmets. The dangerous misconception that any outer covering can prevent a brain from sloshing around in liquid still persists today, in otherwise fine research.

The obvious counterpoint to “the players knew!” is to ask why the NFL went to such great lengths to hide that knowledge. It wasn’t until four years after Bo Jackson played his last snap that the NFL commissioned research into traumatic brain injury. And in its inaugural study, the committee simply discarded data from hundreds of players in an attempt to reach the conclusion that concussions were not a pressing problem.

Research continues, and data is constantly being compiled, sequential breakthroughs being made. We’re going to know more about brain trauma tomorrow than we do today, than we did a year ago, or five years ago, or certainly, in Jackson’s case, than we did 35 years ago. Young players and their parents have more information than they ever did before making decisions about their futures. In the harsh light of day, football seems a lot less attractive. Bo knows.